5 rounds for time of:
7 Deadlifts, 275/185
30 Air Squats
7 Handstand Push Ups

***Reminder***

Monday is Labor Day and Community Day. Bring in a friend for a 9 am only workout! 

P.S. Have your guests sign our online waiver.

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From Calvin:

Hey there everyone! I wanted to talk a little about a somewhat tricky topic: Weight belts.

As some of you know, I use weight belts during WODs here and there and as a matter of fact, I own two different bets for different occasions. One of those belts was gifted to me by the gym for my birthday last year and you guys are amazing so thank you again. That being said, I don't use it that much. Not because I don't like it! I love it. But using a weight belt can be a tricky thing. Before we talk about why it' not good for everyday use, let's talk about why it exists. 

Your core is a vast and complex collection of muscles that activate from all sides. Your Rectus Abdominous, your Spinal Erectors, Obliques, Psoas, and a number of others all have one common goal: To keep your spine happy and safe! These muscles are used every day and are present even for the most mundane activity. When you go to lift an object, you squeeze these muscles that then hold your skeletal structure in place. This helps prevent the body from having undue stress placed on the bones and nerves. When we lose that tension under load we get a "buckled" position and we put ourselves at risk.

The weight belt an external wall surrounding the core to give feedback. Using a belt effectively means taking in air, filling up your torso and squeezing against that air pressure AND the belt together. To be clear: The air adds pressure inside while the belt adds resistance outside. That means that in order to use a belt correctly and safely, one must already know how to brace your midline effectively without it. The common misconception people have is that the belt will "fix" their back or "hold it in place." Not at all what's going on.

So this is why we don't use it all the time. CrossFit is about functional movement. That movement's power is dependent on its quality. Overuse of the belt can trick you into moving less proficiently by providing a false sense of security or by becoming reliant on its use. Now, why even have these things right?

From personal experience, I can tell you that hurting your back sucks. Losing out on training and just the mental defeat of hurting every day is exhausting. What I use it for, and others like myself use it for, is to help with high %  maximal and sub-maximal loads. Back squat, Deadlift, Front Squat, Clean. 80% of 1 RM and higher. The support the belt can give you for these lifts is great and can lead to success. But that is ONLY because you are well versed in abdominal bracing and also spend 90% of your workout time working on improving the real MVPs of the lift: YOUR BACK AND CORE. Without them, the belt is not a tool but a trap. 

Channel your inner Admiral Akbar. Don't fall for it.